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veesdumpingrounds:

small tutorial for newbies to anatomy :) hopefully this is understandable and helpful ! 


littlemisscloudy said: Oh gosh no anon, hello! I was wondering if you had any tips for anatomy? If it wouldn't be a bother...or anything.

Here’s a small tags’ worth of tips on anatomy?



gingerhaze:

shoomlah:

So I was chatting with the lovely Justin Oaksford yesterday, and he casually asked if I used photo reference for my recent Rolemodels piece- not as a bad thing, but because the pose and the camera angle read well.  Pretty sure I grinned like an idiot when he brought it up because, goddammit, I’m proud that the work shows!  I’ve felt like my work has been somewhat stilted as of late- I could feel myself subconsciously trending towards easier angles, easier poses, easier expressions just because it’s slightly less frustrating for my brain to process- so getting that confirmation from a colleague was pretty damn satisfying.

I think there’s a tendency for artists to take pride in being able to draw out of your head, and, while that’s an admittedly important skill, what’s actually important is what that skill implies- it implies that you’ve internalized reference.  That you’ve spent so much time looking at the world around you, studying it, drawing from it, breaking it down, that you’ve amassed an extensive mental library that you can draw from.  You are Google reborn in the shallow husk of a human being.

But heck, the world’s a big place- what are the chances that you ever get to a point that you’ve internalized all of it?  Internalized it AND ALSO are never going to forget it ever?  Probably no chance at all.  Sorry buddy.  So rather than bemoaning the fact that we don’t have impenetrable search engine cyborg brains- yet- you sure as hell better still be using reference to fill in/refresh those empty shelves in your mental library.  You shouldn’t have worm-ridden books about dinosaur anatomy from the 60’s in there.  Stegosauruses with brains in their tails?  CLEAN THAT SHIT OUT.

So my general process for using reference of any sort is:

  1. loose thumbnails and brainstorming.  If you have an idea, get that raw thing- unadulterated in it’s potential shittiness- onto paper.  Good art is a combination of both instinct and discipline, so you don’t want to entirely discount those lightning strikes of brilliance.  Or idiocy.  Happens to all of us.
  2. research and reference.  Start gathering and internalizing whatever reference is pertinent to your piece- could be diagrams, art, photos, good old-fashioned READIN’, whathaveyou.  Please note that this doesn’t mean find one picture of a giraffe- this means find tons of photos of giraffes, read about giraffes, understand giraffes, and learn how to incorporate that knowledge into your art with purpose and intent (Justin uses the word “intent” a lot so I’m stealing it).  Don’t blindly copy what you see, but understand how to integrate it in an interesting and informed manner.
  3. studies and practice.  Could be lumped in with the previous step, granted, but it’s worth reiterating- if you’re drawing something new, it’s worth doing some studies.  You discover things that you wouldn’t otherwise by just staring at them.  It’s weird how I’m still learning this- “Gee golly, six-shooters are way easier to draw now that I’ve drawn a ton of them!” Yes wow Claire BRILLIANT.  Gold star.
  4. go for the gold.  Finally, I’m sure it goes without saying, you integrate all of that research and knowledge into your initial thumbnails.  If you learned something about anatomy, or fashion, or color, or butts, now you can drastically improve your original idea with this newfound knowledge.  Also, per the images above, this is also your chance to improve on the reference- photos are a fantastic tool, but trust your instincts.  Cameras can’t make informed decisions.

…So that’s my soapbox- it’s pretty easy, and it’s totally worth it.  Research and reference lets you stand on the shoulders of giants- it lends legitimacy, specificity, and allure to your work that wouldn’t be there if you were just drawing out of your head 100% of the time.  To put it simply- it makes your work ownable.  It makes you stand out.

It makes you a better artist. :)

-C

Wonderful! One of my least favorite excuses during critique was when the artist would say “but that’s how it looked in my reference photo!” when called out for something in their piece looking awkward or wrong. Reference is a helpful tool, not a rigid map for what the final should look like.



leapinghart:

Wisdom from Sherm Cohen by way of Character Design References!


keylimepie:

ectobiolodaddy:

i think ppl should draw smooches more because basically if you can draw a heart you can draw a KISSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS

i mean these are simple smooch poses but… they are so fun 2 do *_*

image

image



ikimaru:

..not what I meant to do this evening but look I made a tutorial!

this kinda got out of hand but I was having fun shh

remember to experiment around, there are many different ways to do things! B) it’s up to you finding the one you like!

also gomen for crappy handwriting and some rushed drawings



sweetappletea:

irmirx:

Check out this great article: 51 GREAT ANIMATION EXERCISES TO MASTER 

Here are the first 5 from the list! I’ll try to do as many as I can :)

Oooh I need to check these out



relissabt:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture DrawingAs a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.Norm

Wisdom from talented fellow board artist Norm, for anyone curious what “gesture drawing” is really all about.
As with many things, simplicity is key. It’s an important basic skill to develop. Later, apply your gesture drawing skills to more finished drawings, you’ll find they have a lot more life!
Norm and his equally talented wife Griselda run their Tumblr together, check ‘em out!

relissabt:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture Drawing

As a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing 
gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.

I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.

I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.

For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.

Norm

Wisdom from talented fellow board artist Norm, for anyone curious what “gesture drawing” is really all about.

As with many things, simplicity is key. It’s an important basic skill to develop. Later, apply your gesture drawing skills to more finished drawings, you’ll find they have a lot more life!

Norm and his equally talented wife Griselda run their Tumblr together, check ‘em out!




kitkatghost:

elle-est-aimee:

How to, step-by-step, make expressions mean different things by changing just one facial feature at a time. *shrug* I’m not very good at explaining how I do expressions, I just…feel out what kinds of muscles seem to fit and tweak those. And sometimes, ever so slightly, little adjustments could mean the difference between fury and euphoria. 

reference,



sortabentglasses:

tauntaunrider:

caesaretluna:

                     Write Real People
                    click and drag game

  • ONE RULE: DON’T CLICK AND DRAG UNTIL YOU FIND SOMETHING YOU LIKE!
  • if you want me to add anything just write me. i’ll add that and update the post!

I love all the click and drag games on Tumblr and after I read an article about diversity in YA books, I wanted to make a click and drag “game” myself. (i think this was the article, but i’m not sure, sorry)

sortabentglasses this is really freakin cool

this is so cool!




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Useful Tags

Lineart
Shading
Humans
Clothing
Animals
Fan Art
Cartooning
Character Design
Storytelling/Comic Art
Body Language/Expressions

Photo Reference:
Hair
Clothing
Animals

> I do not tag cartooning/fan art posts with the human/animal/clothing tags

> Some tutorials go further into detail/continue and link to deviantArt.

> If you work better with video tutorials there's a tag for that.

> Inspiration

> Joke Tutorials

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Off-Site Links

Colourlovers
conceptart.org
the Human Face
Sam Liu's Tutorial
Human Face/Proportions
How to Steal Like an Artist

Books to Reference

Art & Fear
Comicker's Coloring Book
Perspective! For Comic Book Artists
Artist's Photo Reference: Wildlife
Creating Characters With Personality